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Film Photography

As of writing this line, it has been thirteen years since I took my first course in photography and developed my first roll of black and white film by hand. That was 1996—film photography was just how it was done back then.

These days digital photography has the majority of the photographic market share, leaving us film photographers as some sort of strange or exotic beasts in the world of photography.

I say strange or exotic because, at least from my experiences, there doesn’t seem to be much middle ground about how people respond when they find out that my camera records to film instead of bits. Either it is the strange—people who peer down at me quizzically as if there is something wrong with me, or that I’m ignorant since I haven’t jumped on the digital bandwagon. Else it is the exotic—people who for some reason or another, seem to believe that I am going above and beyond by sticking with film for my photography.

So why film photography?

K. Praslowicz with 100 Rolls of Fuji 400H 220

There are many reasons why film is my preference over digital photography. Notice I used the term preference, not film is better than digital photography. I’ve seen plenty of photographers who seem to react to notion of doing things any way other then their way as a slap in the face. The way I see it, digital photography has many different characteristics versus film photography. Given a photographer’s personal and professional needs, those characteristics very often do make digital the correct choice for those photographers. If natural light photo in low light environments was an area of photography that I was activity pursuing, digital would definitely be the way to go. For the world view of photography that I find myself working in, film fits in very nicely, so I’ve decided to stick with it till the bitter end.

Reasons why I prefer film photography.

  1. The ease of archiving.

This list is small at the moment. But it will get larger as I convert all the thoughts floating around in my head into readable text.